The Trust for Architectural Easements is much more than just an easement-holding organization. We are committed to educating the public about historic preservation, historic architecture, and sustainable development. The Trust publishes newsletters and architectural guides to promote the need for historic preservation in the United States.

Reduce, Reuse, Rehab: Conducting an Energy Audit

In this age of “green technologies” and “sustainability,” responsible property owners are rightfully searching for ways to retrofit their homes to improve energy efficiency. The first fix that springs to most people’s mind is new windows, but when it comes to weatherizing an older building, the interventions need not be drastic in order to see […]

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Preservation by Prevention: Creating a Maintenance Plan

Each year, inspectors for the Trust for Architectural Easements visit more than 830 historic properties where the Trust holds an historic preservation easement or preservation restriction agreement. Following our visits, we report the inspection results to the owners, often alerting them to minor maintenance issues we observed that could ultimately threaten the historic character of […]

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Tour the Belnord Courtyard This December

This December, the Trust for Architectural Easements will again provide an opportunity to tour the little-seen courtyard of the Belnord, a palatial, Renaissance-style apartment building occupying a full city block in the heart of the Upper West Side. The 13-story limestone and terra cotta building – the largest elevator apartment building in the world upon […]

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Part-Time Stewardship Assistant

The Trust for Architectural Easements is seeking a part-time Stewardship Assistant Stewardship Assistant (Part-Time) Operations Overview The Trust for Architectural Easements® is one of the largest preservation easement holding organization in the nation. The Trust raises awareness about the need for historic preservation by providing grants to preservation organizations and community groups. And, through education […]

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Columns: November 2012

The Adaptive Reuse of Historic Churches In 2004, the Boston Archdiocese announced plans to close 65-80 of its 357 parishes. The same year, the Detroit Archdiocese revealed it would close 65 of its churches by 2015. Citing plans for redevelopment New York City’s Archdiocese has closed several iconic churches in Manhattan, including Harlem’s 105-year-old St. […]

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Columns: July 2012

Researching Your House Recently, I have become interested in researching a little bit about the history of my house. I have been told that the house – located in the Maryland suburbs of Washington, DC – was built in the early 1940s, but I do not know much more than that. I found this claim […]

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Preservation by Prevention: Preserving the Irreplaceable 2

Consequences of Lapsed Maintenance (Part Two) Preventative maintenance is an essential element of property ownership. Historic properties, like all buildings, require regular monitoring and upkeep to remedy minor maintenance issues and to guard against significant, and costly, problems down the road. Delayed maintenance can quickly transform a minor issue into a major threat, requiring complete […]

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Preservation by Prevention: Preserving the Irreplaceable

Consequences of Lapsed Maintenance Preventative maintenance is an essential element of property ownership. Historic properties, like all buildings, require regular monitoring and upkeep to remedy minor maintenance issues and to guard against significant, and costly, problems down the road. Delayed maintenance can quickly transform a minor issue into a major threat, requiring complete replacement of […]

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Architectural Ambler: Eagleville Historic District

Holden, Massachusetts This month, the Architectural Ambler visits a recent addition to the National Register of Historic Places: the Eagleville Historic District, a former textile mill village in the town of Holden, Massachusetts. One of Holden’s eight original mill villages, Eagleville is the sole remaining example: a relatively undisturbed collection of 19th and early 20th […]

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